Prevention Strategies


Article Author:
Lisa Kisling


Article Editor:
Joe M Das


Editors In Chief:
Donald Kushner
Annabelle Dookie


Managing Editors:
Avais Raja
Orawan Chaigasame
Carrie Smith
Abdul Waheed
Khalid Alsayouri
Trevor Nezwek
Radia Jamil
Patrick Le
Anoosh Zafar Gondal
Saad Nazir
William Gossman
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Steve Bhimji
John Shell
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Heba Mahdy
Ahmad Malik
Sarosh Vaqar
Mark Pellegrini
James Hughes
Beata Beatty
Nazia Sadiq
Hajira Basit
Phillip Hynes
Tehmina Warsi


Updated:
1/31/2019 10:12:07 PM

Definition/Introduction

The natural history of a disease classifies into five stages: underlying, susceptible, subclinical, clinical and recovery/disability/death. Corresponding preventive health measures have been grouped into similar stages to target the prevention of these stages of a disease. These preventive stages are primordial prevention, primary prevention, secondary prevention, and tertiary prevention. Combined, these strategies not only aim to prevent the onset of disease through risk reduction, but also downstream complications of a manifested disease.

Primordial Prevention:

In 1978, the most recent addition to preventive strategies, primordial prevention, was described. It consists of risk factor reduction targeted towards an entire population through a focus on social and environmental conditions. Such measures typically get promoted through laws and national policy. Because primordial prevention is the earliest prevention modality, it is often aimed at children to decrease as much risk exposure as possible. Primordial prevention targets the underlying stage of natural disease by targeting the underlying social conditions that promote disease onset. An example includes improving access to an urban neighborhood to safe sidewalks to promote physical activity; this, in turn, decreases risk factors for obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, etc.

Primary Prevention:

Primary prevention consists of measures aimed at a susceptible population or individual. The purpose of primary prevention is to prevent a disease from ever occurring. Thus, its target population is healthy individuals. It commonly institutes activities that limit risk exposure or increase the immunity of individuals at risk to prevent a disease from progressing in a susceptible individual to subclinical disease. For example, immunizations are a form of primary prevention.

Secondary Prevention:

Secondary prevention emphasizes early disease detection and its target is healthy-appearing individuals with subclinical forms of the disease. Subclinical disease consists of pathologic changes, but no overt symptoms that are diagnosable in a doctor’s visit. Secondary prevention often occurs in the form of screenings. For example, a Papanicolaou (Pap) smear is a form of secondary prevention aimed to diagnose cervical cancer in its subclinical state prior to progression.  

Tertiary Prevention:

Tertiary prevention targets both the clinical and outcome stages of a disease. It is implemented in symptomatic patients and aims to reduce the severity of the disease as well as of any associated sequelae. While secondary prevention seeks to prevent the onset of illness, tertiary prevention seeks to reduce the effects of the disease once established in an individual. Forms of tertiary prevention are commonly rehabilitation efforts.

Quaternary Prevention:

According to the Wonca International Dictionary for General/Family Practice, Quaternary prevention is defined as: "action taken to identify patients at risk of overmedicalization, to protect him from new medical invasion, and to suggest to him interventions, which are ethically acceptable." Marc Jamoulle initially poposed this concept, and the targets were mainly patients with illness but without a disease. The definition has has undergone recent modification as "‘an action taken to protect individuals (persons/patients) from medical interventions that are likely to cause more harm than good."[1]

Issues of Concern

In the United States, several governing bodies make prevention recommendations. For example, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) is a governing body that makes recommendations for primary and secondary prevention strategies. The Advisory Committee on Immunizations Practices (ACIP) through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) makes recommendations for vaccinations, while the Women’s Preventive Services Initiative (WPSI) makes recommendations appropriate for females. Additionally, various specialty organizations such as the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG), the American Cancer Society (ACS), etc. also make prevention recommendations. With the multitude of information and recommending bodies, it is often challenging for healthcare professionals to remain up to date on changing endorsements.

Further, while preventive services are regulated and must undergo scrutinous safety testing, there is risk involved with prevention. Particularly, primary and secondary preventive factors targeted at intervening in healthy-appearing individuals. It is often challenging to gain buy-in with patients regarding the risk-benefit ratio of various preventive services.

Finally, the cost of preventive services is commonly a topic of discussion. Several cost-benefit analyses have been undertaken regarding the evaluation of preventive services with varying degrees of confidence. While often a long-term gain of healthy life-years is noted, preventive services are not inexpensive, which can limit the use of these services by both healthcare systems and patients and is a consideration when promoting preventive services.

Clinical Significance

Preventive services have proven an important aspect of healthcare; however, they appear consistently underutilized in the United States.[2][3][4] With cost, time, and resource constraints on physicians, many preventive services get overlooked for patients. It is important for physicians to remain up to date on the prevention guidelines and ensure all patients are offered appropriate services with a full explanation of risks and benefits.

Some examples of commonly used prevention strategies are:

Primordial:

  • Government policy: Increasing taxes on cigarettes; Decreasing advertisement of tobacco
  • Built Environment: Access to safe walking paths; access to stores with healthy food options

Primary:

  • Immunizations
  • Tobacco Cessation Programs
  • Needle Exchange Programs
  • Micro-Nutrient Supplementation Programs

Secondary:

  • Papanicolaou (Pap) smear for early detection of cervical cancer
  • Mammography, for early detection of breast cancer
  • Colonoscopies, for early detection of colon cancer
  • Blood Pressure Screening

Tertiary:

  • Occupational and physical therapy in burn patients
  • Cardiac rehab in post-myocardial infarction patients
  • Diabetic foot care

Quarternary:

 The following conditions which are susceptible to over-treatment:

  • Radiological incidentalomas
  • The use of antiarrhythmic drugs after myocardial infarction that reduced arrhythmias but increased mortality
  • The use of hormone replacement therapy led to increased the number of cases of breast cancers, stroke, and thromboembolic events. It was also a failure in reducing cardiovascular mortality. 
  • Medically unexplained symptoms
  • Functional disorders
  • Bodily distress syndrome

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Prevention Strategies - Questions

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Which of the following represents primary child suicide prevention?



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Which of the following measures is effective at preventing injuries?



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Primary prevention strategies:



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What type of prevention is performing Pap smears on all eligible female patients?



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Cardiovascular and pulmonary risk reduction and primary prevention have been identified as the primary improvement areas for practice. Which of the following would best achieve this goal?



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A patient recently had a stroke and continues to experience right-sided residual weakness. He is enrolled him in weekly physical therapy in hopes of improving his weakness. You are pleased that you are continuing to practice disease-prevention, but an associate argues that since the patient already had a stroke, this can no longer be termed as preventative. What is the best response?



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Prevention Strategies - References

References

Chung S,Romanelli RJ,Stults CD,Luft HS, Preventive visit among older adults with Medicare's introduction of Annual Wellness Visit: Closing gaps in underutilization. Preventive medicine. 2018 Oct;     [PubMed]
Kottke TE,Solberg LI,Brekke ML,Cabrera A,Marquez MA, Delivery rates for preventive services in 44 midwestern clinics. Mayo Clinic proceedings. 1997 Jun;     [PubMed]
Smith RA,Andrews KS,Brooks D,Fedewa SA,Manassaram-Baptiste D,Saslow D,Brawley OW,Wender RC, Cancer screening in the United States, 2017: A review of current American Cancer Society guidelines and current issues in cancer screening. CA: a cancer journal for clinicians. 2017 Mar;     [PubMed]
Martins C,Godycki-Cwirko M,Heleno B,Brodersen J, Quaternary prevention: reviewing the concept. The European journal of general practice. 2018 Dec     [PubMed]

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