Acute Postpartum Hemorrhage


Article Author:
Kelly Wormer
Radia Jamil


Article Editor:
Suzanne Bryant


Editors In Chief:
Casey Ciresi


Managing Editors:
Avais Raja
Orawan Chaigasame
Carrie Smith
Abdul Waheed
Khalid Alsayouri
Trevor Nezwek
Radia Jamil
Patrick Le
Anoosh Zafar Gondal
Saad Nazir
William Gossman
Hassam Zulfiqar
Hussain Sajjad
Steve Bhimji
Muhammad Hashmi
John Shell
Matthew Varacallo
Heba Mahdy
Ahmad Malik
Sarosh Vaqar
Mark Pellegrini
James Hughes
Beata Beatty
Beenish Sohail
Nazia Sadiq
Hajira Basit
Phillip Hynes


Updated:
6/5/2019 2:50:58 PM

Introduction

Obstetric hemorrhage is the most common and dangerous complication of childbirth. Traditionally, postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) has been traditionally defined as greater than 500 mL estimated blood loss in a vaginal delivery or greater than 1000 mL estimated blood loss at the time of cesarean delivery. This was redefined in 2017 by the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology as cumulative blood loss greater than 1000 mL with signs and symptoms hypovolemia within 24 hours of the birth process, regardless of the route of delivery.  While this was change was made with the knowledge that blood loss at the time of delivery is routinely underestimated, blood loss at the time of vaginal delivery greater than 500 mL should be considered abnormal with the potential need for intervention. Primary postpartum hemorrhage is bleeding that occurs in the first 24 hours after delivery, while secondary postpartum hemorrhage is characterized as bleeding that occurs 24 hours to 12 weeks postpartum.[1][2][3]

Etiology

Primary causes of postpartum hemorrhage include uterine atony, genital tract lacerations, retained placenta, uterine inversion, abnormal placentation, and coagulation disorders. Uterine atony, or lack of effective contraction of the uterus, is the most common cause of postpartum hemorrhage.

Secondary causes of postpartum hemorrhage include retained products of conception, infection, subinvolution of the placental site, and inherited coagulation deficits.[4][5][6][7]

Epidemiology

Postpartum hemorrhage is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in childbirth.  PPH occurs in approximately 1% to 6% of all deliveries.  Uterine atony, the primary cause of PPH, accounts for 70% to 80% of all hemorrhage.

Pathophysiology

Risk factors for postpartum hemorrhage are dependent on the etiology of the hemorrhage. Risk factors for uterine atony include high maternal parity, chorioamnionitis, prolonged use of oxytocin, general anesthesia, and conditions that cause increased distention of the uterus such as multiple gestation, polyhydramnios, fetal macrosomia, and uterine fibroids. Risk factors that can lead to uterine inversion include excessive umbilical cord traction, short umbilical cord, and fundal implantation of the placenta. Genital tract trauma risk factors include operative vaginal delivery and precipitous delivery. Retained placenta and abnormal placentation are more common if an incomplete placenta is noted at delivery, a succenturiate lobe of the placenta is present, or if the patient has a history of previous uterine surgery.  Coagulation abnormalities are more common in patients presenting with fetal death in utero, placental abruption, sepsis, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC), and in those with a history of an inherited coagulation defect.

The California PPH toolkit states that those patients who are bleeding on presentation to labor and delivery, those with history PPH, hematocrit less than 30%, history of bleeding diathesis or coagulation deficit, morbidly adherent placenta, or with hypotension or tachycardia on presentation to labor and delivery should be considered high risk for PPH on admission.[8][9][10][11]

History and Physical

Patients present with acute bleeding post-partum.

Evaluation

Initial evaluation of the patient should include a rapid assessment of the patient’s status and risk factors. In postpartum women, signs or symptoms of blood loss such as tachycardia and hypotension may be masked, so if these signs are present, there should be a concern for considerable blood volume loss (greater than 25% of total blood volume). Continuous assessment of vital signs and on-going estimation of total blood loss is an important factor in ensuring safe care of the patient with PPH.

An exam of the patient at the time of hemorrhage can help to identify the probable cause of bleeding focused on any specific risks factors the patient may have. A rapid assessment of the entire genital tract for lacerations, hematomas, or signs of uterine rupture should be performed.  Possible manual exam and extraction for any retained placental tissue or assessment by bedside ultrasound may be a part of the evaluation. A soft, “boggy” or non-contracted uterus is the common finding with uterine atony. Uterine inversion presents as round bulge or mass with palpation of the fundal wall in the cervix or lower uterine segment and is often associated with excessive traction on the umbilical cord or abnormally adherent placenta. Widespread bleeding, such as from venipuncture sites, is a sign of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC).

Laboratory studies can be ordered in a PPH to help evaluate and manage the patient, although interventions such as medication or blood product administration should not be withheld pending the results of such studies. Type and screen or crossmatch may be ordered to prepare for possible blood transfusion. Complete blood count to assess hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelets can be evaluated at intervals although lab values often lag behind the clinical presentation. Coagulation studies and fibrinogen will be useful in the patient where DIC is suspected.

Treatment / Management

The treatment and management of postpartum hemorrhage are focused on resuscitation of the patient while identifying and treating the specific cause. [12]

Maintaining hemodynamic stability of the patient is important to ensure continued perfusion to vital organs. Ample intravenous (IV) access should be obtained. Careful direct assessment of cumulative blood loss is important, and a focus should be on early initiation of protocols for the release of blood products and massive transfusion protocols.

Rapid identification of the cause of postpartum hemorrhage and initiating treatment should be done simultaneously. Transfer to an operating suite with anesthesia assistance may be indicated for help with a difficult laceration repair, to correct uterine inversion, to help provide analgesia if needed for removal of retained products, or if surgical exploration is indicated.

If the postpartum hemorrhage is due to uterine atony, treatment modalities include medical management with uterotonic agents, uterine tamponade, pelvic artery embolization, and surgical management.

Medical management with uterotonic and pharmacologic agents is typically the first step if uterine atony is identified. While oxytocin is given routinely by most institutions at the time of delivery (see prevention), additional uterotonic medications may be given with bimanual massage in an initial response to hemorrhage. Uterotonic agents include oxytocin, ergot alkaloids, and prostaglandins. Commonly used uterotonic include:

  • Oxytocin: A hormone naturally produced by the posterior pituitary works rapidly to cause uterine contraction with no contraindications and minimal side effects.

  • Methylergonovine: Semi-synthetic ergot alkaloid.  Works rapidly for sustained uterine contraction.  Contraindicated in patients with hypertension. 

  • Carboprost: Synthetic prostaglandin analogue of PGF Contraindicated in severe hepatic, renal, and cardiovascular disease, may cause bronchospasm in asthmatics.

  • Misoprostol: Prostaglandin E1 analogue. More delayed onset than above medications.

If bimanual massage and uterotonic medications are not sufficient to control hemorrhage, uterine tamponade may be considered. An intrauterine balloon tamponade system can be used, typically by filling an intrauterine balloon with 250 to 500 mL of normal saline. If there is not an intrauterine balloon readily available, the uterus may be packed with gauze, or multiple large Foley catheters may be placed concurrently. It is important to keep an accurate count of anything placed in the uterus to prevent retained foreign body.

Uterine artery embolization may be considered in the stable patient with persistent bleeding. Fluoroscopy is used to identify and occlude bleeding vessels. While the unstable patient is not a candidate for this modality, it has the benefit of uterine conservation and possible future fertility.

Exploratory laparotomy is typically indicated in the setting where less invasive measures for postpartum hemorrhage have failed or if the suspected reason for postpartum hemorrhage such as morbidly adherent placenta, demands it. A midline vertical abdominal incision should be considered to maximize exposure; however, if the patient had a cesarean delivery, the existing incision may be utilized. Vascular ligation sutures may be attempted to decrease pulse pressure at the uterus. Bilateral uterine artery ligation (O’Leary sutures) sutures may be placed as well as bilateral utero-ovarian ligament ligation sutures. Ligation of the internal iliac arteries may also be performed however as this entails a retroperitoneal approach, it is rarely used. Uterine compression sutures may also be used as a treatment for atony. The B-Lynch suture technique, the most commonly performed of the compression sutures, physically compresses the uterus looping from the cervix to the fundus. The definitive treatment for postpartum hemorrhage is a hysterectomy. A peripartum hysterectomy is associated not only with permanent sterility but also increased surgical risk with higher risk of bladder and ureteral injury. Supracervical hysterectomy may be performed alternately as a faster surgery with potentially fewer complicated risks.

If the PPH has a cause other than atony, the treatment modality should be specifically tailored to the cause. Genital tract lacerations should be repaired or pressure/packing used. Retained products of conception should be removed manually or by dilation and curettage procedure. Hematomas can be managed by observation alone or may need fluoroscopy/embolization or surgical intervention if needed. If the uterine inversion is the cause of PPH, steady pressure with the fist is used to replace the uterus to correct position. Uterine relaxants such as a halogenated anesthetic, terbutaline, magnesium sulfate, or nitroglycerine can be used during uterine repositioning, with oxytocin and other uterotonics given once the uterus is in normal anatomical position. Occasionally surgical correction of inversion must be undertaken via laparotomy. If a coagulation deficit exists, blood factor and product replacement may be used to correct the deficit.

Deterrence and Patient Education

Preventative techniques can be used in patients to prevent atony and PPH including active management of the third stage of labor with oxytocin administration, uterine massage, and umbilical cord traction.  Identifying high-risk patients before delivery is one of the most important factors in preventing morbidity and mortality associated with PPH. This allows for planning appropriate route and timing of delivery in the appropriate medical resource setting. Patients with previous cesarean delivery should have ultrasound evaluation antepartum to help determine appropriate route and place of delivery. Treatment of patients with anemia by either oral or parenteral iron supplementation should be considered, especially in patients with hematocrit less than 30%. Additionally, consideration for erythropoietin stimulating agents with hematology consultation should be undertaken in the high-risk patient, especially in those who do not accept a blood transfusion.

Standardized, multidisciplinary protocols have been used to help decrease severe maternal morbidity associated with postpartum hemorrhage that involves a focus on unit readiness, recognition and prevention, response, and reporting/systems learning. The nursing and anesthesia teams should be aware of the postpartum hemorrhage and available to assist. Simulation activities can be utilized in event training in PPH and have been shown to improve outcomes.

Enhancing Healthcare Team Outcomes

Postpartum hemorrhage is one of the true surgical emergencies in obstetrics. The condition is best managed by a multidisciplinary team that also includes laboratory personnel and labor and delivery nurses.

The treatment and management of postpartum hemorrhage are focused on resuscitation of the patient while identifying and treating the specific cause. However, in many cases the cause is surgical. Maintaining hemodynamic stability of the patient is important to ensure continued perfusion to vital organs. Ample intravenous (IV) access should be obtained. Careful direct assessment of cumulative blood loss is important, and a focus should be on early initiation of protocols for the release of blood products and massive transfusion protocols. Rapid identification of the cause of postpartum hemorrhage and initiating treatment should be done simultaneously. To improve outcomes, the resuscitation should be done in an OR setting as anesthesia assistance may be indicated for help with a difficult laceration repair, to correct uterine inversion, to help provide analgesia if needed for removal of retained products, or if surgical exploration is indicated.


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Acute Postpartum Hemorrhage - Questions

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Which of the following causes the majority of postpartum hemorrhage?



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A 32-year-old has just delivered a baby vaginally after a long labor. She is bleeding profusely and has failed to respond to oxytocin and bimanual massage. The uterus appears boggy and hypotonic. What step should be taken next in the management of this patient?



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What is the best method to control normal postpartum bleeding?



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A patient is four hours postpartum and saturates a perineal pad in 15 minutes. What should be done initially?



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Who has the greatest risk of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH)?



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Which home discharge instruction is inappropriate following postpartum hemorrhage (PPH)?



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A 28-year old female in her 36th week of pregnancy presents to the emergency department with complaints of swelling of her feet and general malaise. She was fine until the 28th week of her pregnancy when she was diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Her blood pressure has always been fine. Today her BP is 155/92 mmHg, pulse 90 bpm, RR 20/min, and she is afebrile. The patient's blood work is normal, including her liver enzyme panel and INR. Urine analysis reveals a protein level of 0.7 g/l. What is the most common cause of maternal mortality during pregnancy?



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What is the most common cause of postpartum hemorrhage?



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Which of the following is not a risk factor for a postpartum hemorrhage?



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A 22-year-old primiparous patient has an immediate postpartum hemorrhage. On assessment, she is having rapid bleeding and is tachycardic. Which would not be immediately indicated?



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A patient with known severe hypertension has a postpartum hemorrhage 4 hours after delivery. Which uterotonic medication is contraindicated?



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A 27-year-old G2P2 patient has a postpartum hemorrhage from uterine atony immediately after the birth of her second child. Her bleeding does not respond to bimanual massage and uterotonic medications. Her estimated blood loss is 1500 mL. She is transferred to the operating suite, anesthesia is made aware, and bloodwork is drawn while another IV is placed. Which of the following is true?



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A mother gave birth two hours ago, and saturates the perineal pad within ten minutes. What nursing interventions are appropriate for the care of this client? Select all that apply.



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A 36-year-old female delivered a healthy baby boy vaginally 4 hours ago. The nurse assigned to the client performs an assessment and notices the peri-pad is saturated. It was placed 15 minutes ago, and the protective pad directly underneath is saturated. The nurse verifies the pad count and confirms the client is soaking a peri-pad every 15 to 20 minutes. Current vital signs are blood pressure 92/64 mmHg, heart rate 122 beats/min, respiratory rate 22, pulse oximetry 92% on room air, and pain level 8/10. The client is pale, anxious, feels dizzy, and the uterus is boggy. What steps will the nurse perform in the management of care for this client? Select all that apply.



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Acute Postpartum Hemorrhage - References

References

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Gillissen A,van den Akker T,Caram-Deelder C,Henriquez DDCA,Bloemenkamp KWM,de Maat MPM,van Roosmalen JJM,Zwart JJ,Eikenboom J,van der Bom JG, Coagulation parameters during the course of severe postpartum hemorrhage: a nationwide retrospective cohort study. Blood advances. 2018 Oct 9;     [PubMed]
Shakur H,Beaumont D,Pavord S,Gayet-Ageron A,Ker K,Mousa HA, Antifibrinolytic drugs for treating primary postpartum haemorrhage. The Cochrane database of systematic reviews. 2018 Feb 20;     [PubMed]
Tanaka H,Matsunaga S,Yamashita T,Okutomi T,Sakurai A,Sekizawa A,Hasegawa J,Terui K,Miyake Y,Murotsuki J,Ikeda T, A systematic review of massive transfusion protocol in obstetrics. Taiwanese journal of obstetrics     [PubMed]
Vasquez DN,Plante L,Basualdo MN,Plotnikow GG, Obstetric Disorders in the ICU. Seminars in respiratory and critical care medicine. 2017 Apr;     [PubMed]
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Maswime S,Buchmann E, A systematic review of maternal near miss and mortality due to postpartum hemorrhage. International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics: the official organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics. 2017 Apr;     [PubMed]

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